SUNDANCE REVIEW: UNDER THE ELECTRIC SKY

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Photography by : Ask Media

Text by : Conor Ambrose

January 21, 2014

In 1997 Pasquale Rotella held the first Electric Daisy Carnival hoping to bring the energy of a dying genre back to Los Angeles. 16 years later his brainchild became arguably the largest and most anticipated festival in the world, attracting nearly 350,000 attendants to EDC Las Vegas in 2013. But Rotella’s biggest accomplishment might still be to come after the premier of Under The Electric Sky at the Sundance Film Festival, a film that serves both as the greatest marketing tool for Insomniac and a remarkable visual display.

The 85-minute pseudo-documentary is driven by original production from Kaskade and insane live footage from some of the biggest performers including Avicii, Afrojack, Tiësto, Calvin Harris and Gareth Emery, whom all past festivalgoers will adore. But for those who have never made the trek to Vegas in the 100+ degree desert temperatures mid-June, it creates an entirely different show. For the first time an audience can appreciate the nearly over stimulating experience without actually having to purchase a ticket.

The picture also contains a lot of sit-down interviews and on-the-go dialogue from the six groups of individuals Under The Electric Sky follows. Producers Dan Cutforth and Jane Lipsitz stressed the extensive screening process for this cast, saying that they used Rotella’s far-reaching network to invite fans to be a part of the movie. However, the main characters’ personalities directly align with stereotypical perceptions of the genre—tank top sporting, beer chugging bros and bi-sexual co-eds are just two examples. While these types of individuals undoubtedly make up a significant portion of the EDC crowd, it would have been interesting to see the filmmakers shed more light on the less-cliché aspects of the festival.

That being said, at the end of the night every EDM fan will find something to love about Under The Electric Sky. The directors spectacularly captured the world Pasquale tirelessly worked to create for his followers, allowing moviegoers to completely immerse themselves in the 3D festival experience.